Hard times, big hearts in Uganda

Today the story of the Candian Co-operative Association’s international development work and highlights from my own personal adventure were the subject of an article in local paper, the Leader-Post. Many thanks to the Leader-Post and to Will Chabun for sharing this (and to the Saskatoon Star Phoenix for adding it to your paper).

http://www.leaderpost.com/search/Hard+times+hearts+Uganda/7746635/story.html

Uganda article LP

The look of sustainability

We visited numerous farms during our time in Uganda. One thing that became clear very quickly was that the land is ultra fertile and the diversification among the crops farmers can yield is quite vast.

Below is a photo essay capturing a few of the commonly seen commodity crops that provide sustainability for the farmer’s families; their communities and whoever is on the receiving end of the exporting trail. Most important to note though is that the farming practice is the livelihood of many Ugandans and it truly sustains their families and provides  a life with potential for future generations.

Cassava – a root vegetable, starchy much like the potato. It is a main source of carbohydrates for many and considered a staple crop. Another staple crop not pictured here, but grown extensively is maize (corn). cassava Continue reading

10 reasons to visit family friendly Yorkton

If you have ever thought about a day or overnight visit to Yorkton, I encourage you to see it through. With relatives in Yorkton, I like to bring my family there not only for a visit but to experience what makes this city a great place for families to enjoy. Here are ten reasons you and your family will appreciate this welcoming city.

Click the image below to read the December issue of Pink magazine today. December Pink Yorkton

Knowledge is light

I must preface my blog posts to this page. Although this blog is generally based on travel, the content I post on the mission to Uganda may not fit the normal profile you have been used to reading on this site. I assure you there is a reason. This and pending posts regarding the IFAPI project describe what are important conclusions from my perspective. I also feel strongly they are stories that deserve to be shared.

So onward I go.

Continue reading